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All American Survey Image-truthful

Can typefaces represent values such as liberty, equality and truth? 

You gather a great deal of meaning about the words a person says from their tone of voice. Are they happy, truthful, authentic? Typefaces/fonts influence your interpretation of the words you read in a similar way. When the font and words are in harmony you are more likely to trust them. When they don’t match the words can feel less authentic.

Equality

This is a new survey exploring which fonts best communicate some of the core American values taken from the Declaration of Independence. Very early results are in (you can see them at the end of the survey), although not enough people have yet taken part for these to be meaningful. Full results will be published when enough people have taken part. Do you think your answers will match the majority?

Click here to take the survey, you will see the early results at the end.

 

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Typography might just help you date, solve obesity and impact your mood; so we’ve learnt from type fanatic Sarah Hyndman. We’ve previously dubbed her “the one woman tour-de-force behind the Type Tasting enterprise”, which looks at the power typography has over our lives and senses. She’s now published a new book on the subject, Why Fonts Matter, and has kindly offered us an extract looking at the effects of typography on our emotions.

“Physically, we use our voice, facial expressions. gestures and posture to convey a wide range of emotional cues from the subtle to the dramatic. Typefaces and the way they are used provide a similarly extensive emotional range typographically.”

Read the full article.

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The World’s Most Expensive-looking Font Might Surprise You
By Madeleine Morley for AIGA

When you hear the word “luxury,” it’s easy to conjure up the colors gold, silver, and velvety purple; yet when it comes to typography, what we associate with wealth is less clear-cut. For the ancient Greeks, rare and precious purple ink came from sea snails found deep in the ocean, a dye so difficult to obtain it was reserved for kings. We don’t mine the sea for letters of the alphabet though, so what’s the typeface equivalent of purple ink, the fanciest looking font?

Writer and typographer Sarah Hyndman, whose last book explored the tastes we associate with different fonts, investigated the relationship between typography and cost in her latest survey at the V&A in London. Hyndman sought to find out whether a font can truly make a product appear more expensive, and also whether certain typographic characteristics have been consigned to the bargain bin.

After surveying over 368 people, the results suggest that bold typefaces with rounder terminals appear cheaper, whereas lighter weights, serifs, and contrasts are rated appear more expensive, with the modern Didot selected as the diamond of all fonts. This is perhaps, unsurprising; the serif is associated with fashion and you can find it on the mastheads of magazines like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

Read the full article here…

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