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You are invited to our Type Tasting Christmas Open Studios Weekend on 25th & 26th November from 11am-5pm. The Chocolate Factory N16, Farleigh Place (off Farleigh Road), London N16 7SX.

There will be something experimental taking place in the Pop-up Lab. The studio will be full of all things typography—to look at and to buy. Including signed copies of Sarah’s books, limited edition screen prints, and letters to hang on your Christmas tree.

Chat to Sarah about an event or workshop for your organisation, either as a Christmas jolly or some teambuilding inspiration to see in the New Year. This year she has created Type Tastings for adidas, British Academy, Bumble Bizz, D&AD, The Fragrance Forum, Monotype at Design Thinkers Toronto, the V&A for the London Design Festival, Wellcome Collection, and WGSN.

Private view evening
Type Tasting supporters are invited to the private view on Friday 24th November from 6.30pm-9.30pm, please RSVP sarah(a)typetasting.com

Design student typographic survival kit

Here is some advice for students starting a new term on how fonts can help your studies, from Sarah Hyndman’s book Why Fonts Matter.

1. Use fonts to give your words a personality

Helvetica, Times New Roman and Comic Sans walk into a bar. The barman turns to Comic Sans and says ‘sorry we don’t serve your type in here’.

This familiar joke demonstrates that fonts have personalities that we recognise easily. Some are unassuming, whilst others are larger-than-life like Mike Lacher’s version of Comic Sans, who says, ‘People love me. Why? Because I’m fun. I’m the life of the party’, then goes out and gets drunk with Papyrus.

2. A font could make you appear more intelligent

When student Phil Renaud was nearing the end of his third year at university he noticed that his grade average had improved. He wondered why, since he did not think he was putting any more effort into studying or writing. He realised that the one thing that had changed over time was his choice of font, and so he looked back at the 52 essays he had submitted and compared the grades and typefaces. He found that when he used Georgia his grade average was A, with Times New Roman it was A-minus, whilst the essays written in Trebuchet only averaged B-minus.

3. Change the font to improve your memory

An unfamiliar typeface slows our reading down and makes us pay attention, which takes us off autopilot and our brain invests greater time and attention in what we are reading. A high school in Ohio discovered that when students studied from texts in an unfamiliar font, their exam results were higher than those who had been given the books in a more familiar and readable one. Try switching your notes into a difficult-to-read font when you are trying to memorise them.

4. Use a font to make a difficult task seem easier

Psychologists at the University of Michigan ran an experiment to see if they could motivate a group of 20-year-old college students to exercise by giving them instructions for an exercise routine printed in one of two typefaces. They found that those who read the instructions in Arial, the easy-to-read typeface, estimated the exercise routine would take around half the time to do, and said they would be more likely to incorporate it into their daily routine than those who read the instructions in Mistral, a hard-to-read font. The participants misread the ease of reading the instructions for the ease of actually doing the exercises.

When you are working on a topic you find difficult, try selecting an easy-to-read font while you work, like copywriter Michael Everett who creates his invoices in Century Gothic because this makes the task seem less of a chore.

5. Avoid font faux pas

Select the ‘wrong’ typeface and you can unwittingly commit a font faux pas with the potential to overshadow, or even undermine, the credibility of your message. In 2012 CERN announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, or ‘God’ particle. This was a momentous scientific event but, within hours of the news, “Comic Sans”, the font in which the announcement was made, was trending higher on Twitter than the discovery itself. It became a major talking point that such an important scientific breakthrough should be announced in a style inspired by comic books.

Find out more in Why Fonts Matter by Sarah Hyndman, Penguin/Random House.

Win a student survival kit

Head over to Type Tasting on Instagram to win a design student survival kit containing a signed copy of Why Fonts Matter and essential goodies including a typographic tea towel, sketchbook and stickers to tag your belongings. September 2017.

Sarah hyndman on 60 years of this iconic typeface, understanding it in context of social history, and what her research tells us about its personality.

Typefaces/fonts reflect the defining spirit of a period in time. They are shaped by the ideas and aspirations of the era, and as a result they document cultural change. One of the most high profile examples of this is the now 60-year-old Helvetica; a typeface designed to be neutral and devoid of a personality. Instead it became the figurehead for the dramatic social shifts beginning in the post-war 1950s; a time of breaking with the traditions of the past as people looked to a new future.

Life in the 1950s was ruled by social conventions: marriage; men had a career to support their family; women stayed at home to look after the family; Sunday was still essentially Victorian in character; suits or corsets were everyday attire; in Britain received pronunciation, or ‘BBC English’, ruled the airwaves. The advent of the teenager was accompanied by the new rock ‘n’ roll music, which older generations thought would lead to juvenile delinquency.

In the US this was a time of economic growth after the end of World War II, along with the boom in the number of babies being born as people looked to the future with a new optimism for peace and prosperity. The civil rights movement was gaining momentum and demanding change. In Britain, despite food still being rationed, post-war austerity and high taxes, there was an excitement about the future and the 1951 Festival of Britain was a celebration of the nation’s innovations.

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Winter evening corporate client events and teambuilding typography workshops
By Sarah Hyndman

When the days start to get shorter, why not arrange a Type Tasting to brighten up an evening? Choose from a creative typography session to refuel your team away from the computers, a wine tasting evening as a company social, or a type perception masterclass to inform and entertain.

Learn, socialise & create evening
Teambuilding (best served with pizza and lashings of beer)
A social evening designed to refresh your team’s creativity as they roll up their sleeves to experiment with typography and markmaking materials away from the computer. The workshop can come to you, or it can be hosted for up to 15 participants in the Type Tasting studio in London.

Typographic rebellion: Explore how type gives angst and rebellion a voice and create your own typographic expletives.
Type and sound: Use sound stimuli to inspire your creative typography and idea generation.
Type and taste: Explore how taste can be represented typographically, based on research with the Crossmodal Research Laboratory.

Wine & Type Tasting evening
Do you Judge a Wine by its Label?
A new wine and type tasting evening, based on the sell-out success at the London Design Festival. Take part in a series of activities and games that will delight and inform, in a relaxed and social setting.

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Do you Judge a Wine by its Label?
Arrange a Wine & Type Tasting evening for your team and clients
By Sarah Hyndman

We will bring this innovative type and wine tasting, based on the sell-out success at the London Design Festival, to you for your team and clients. What does the design of the label tell you about what you’re going to drink? How does this influence your expectations and even what you taste? Learn about the science of taste and the senses; how design can influence what you drink; and ultimately whether the packaging is just there to inform you, or does it transform your drinking experience?

Take part in a series of activities and games that will delight and inform, in a relaxed and social setting. This includes results from exciting research that Sarah Hyndman is currently involved in with the Crossmodal Research Laboratory, University of Oxford.

“Frankly brilliant idea of combining a type workshop with a wine tasting” It’s Nice That

“I learnt so much while having fun and enjoying delicious wines” A Glimpse of London

“Fun and informative” “Eye-opening” “Interesting and surprising” “Fascinating” “Illuminating” “A different perspective” “Typography + wine tasting = the best of both worlds” “Fantastic experience, would definitely recommend it” “Great, fun and informative”

“It was certainly an eye-opener to realise that so much of what we taste is influenced by our other senses” SEEN London

“More than an excuse for weeknight drinking, wine was a clever example of the influence of typeface … don’t worry; you don’t need to be a typography nerd” Digital Arts

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Font Selfie Workshop at the V&A for the London Design Festival
Type Tasting
Saturday 16th and Sunday 17th September
11am to 5pm, free drop in, no booking necessary
Sackler Centre, Victoria and Albert Museum
London Design Festival 2017

Come along to the Type Tasting workshop at the Victoria and Albert Museum where you can pick a typeface that reflects your personality and customise it to create your own ‘Font Selfie’. Your design will be added to the display in this prestigious museum, which will grow throughout the weekend as we create an exciting collection of typographic self-portraits. You can showcase your work and follow the growing collection online at #FontSelfie. You are welcome to collect your work between 5pm and 5.30pm on Sunday.

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Storytelling with Fonts
Talk at 2pm on Saturday and Sunday

Author and Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman will give a short talk on telling stories with fonts. She will also be signing copies of her books.

Participate in font personality research
Hyndman has created this mass participation experiment as part of her ongoing research, which will form the basis for her next book. She needs your help: either come along to the Type Tasting Pop Up Laboratory at the V&A, or click here to take part online.

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I would like to invite you to join me on Sunday 2nd July for a drink and to look through development sketches and final drawings created for my recent book ‘How to Draw Type and Influence People’. This is also an opportunity to talk to me about the workshops and events that I host, along with my research adventures (including the collaborative ‘Jelly bean’ study that has just been submitted with Professor Charles Spence, University of Oxford).

There will be a studio sale of screen prints, postcards and pictures from earlier stages of my career, these will be offered at specially discounted prices and are not available anywhere else.

The open day will take place on Sunday 2nd July from midday until 6pm in Studio F7, The Chocolate Factory N16, Farleigh Place, Stoke Newington, London, N16 7SX. I would be grateful if you would RSVP to sarah(a)typetasting.com. Other studios will be open for you to browse around and talk to the artists.

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