What is a typographic intervention? What if it’s not what it says on the tin? Can typography alter your experiences, or nudge you to change your behaviour?

This year we are exploring the potential for creating typographic interventions that initiate positive behaviour change. You are invited to take part in typographic research. Some of the experiments you will take part in are in their early proof of concept stages, for others data is being gathered potentially to be published as a future collaborative study.

The Type Tasting Pop-up Typography Lab will be in residence at the D&AD Festival with a series of experiments running throughout the festival designed to gather data, and also to encourage you to think differently about typefaces and perception as you take part in them. Find out more here.

Sarah will be speaking at about the results of this ongoing project at the Museum of Brands on 25th October. This is intended as a conversation starter about the language of enticement vs the voice of authority or guilt, with a view to publishing the results later in the year. The first stages of the explorations have been featured in The Times and iNewspaper.

* Take part in the research online by clicking on the links below *

       

 

 

 

Type Tasting launched on 14th February 2013. Since then we’ve had the opportunity to meet and collaborate with so many amazing people, to work with forward-thinking and dynamic organisations, and to be a part of exciting events around the world. A huge thank you to everybody who’s taken part.

10 prize giveaway packs of signed books and goodies are up for grabs to celebrate five years of Type Tasting. Questions (or where to find the question) can be found each day on Instagram or Twitter #TypeTasting5years. To enter the competion each day, and find clues to the answers, click here.

One pack will be given away each day to a participant with a UK address (except the prize draw on February 16th, which is available to an international winner). Each prize pack contains a selection of typographic goodies that take the theme of that day’s question. There are signed books by Sarah Hyndman (including exclusive copies of the limited first edition of The Type Taster, which is out of print). Special prizes include tickets to one of the last ever public N16 Ghostsigns tours, goodies from Monotype, a pair of tickets to the fantastic Museum of Brands and a voucher for Laithwaite’s wine.

Type Tasting creates experiential learning scenarios designed to entertain and ignite curiosity through type and all the senses. Participants are immersed in the discovery process with experiments, activities and tastings designed to be thought-provoking. Everything is dished up with fun and a theatrical twist. Founded by graphic designer Sarah Hyndman in 2013, deliverables include interactive talks, immersive events, activity-packed workshops, and mass-participation creativity events. Find out more.

Type Tasting serves up the trends for 2018
By Sarah Hyndman

The Type Tasting launch event for 2018 served up a typeface four ways: as a cocktail, confectionery, scent and sound. Each taster was announced with an explanation designed to provoke discussion as guests engaged with the experience, at the end they received a menu-style trend report.

The typeface starring in the event has been selected to encapsulate the mood and visual themes predicted by trend forecasters for 2018. Predictions were combined with survey results which Hyndman cross-referenced with historical typefaces to make the final selection. Her chosen face is intended for ephemeral usage best suited to here-today-gone-tomorrow Instagram and social media posts.

Read More

What typography trends are forecast for 2018 and how can you use them?
Trend 7. Fashion
By Sarah Hyndman

This part 7 in a series of posts looking at typography trends that we predict will influence graphic design in 2018, and explaining how you can incorporate each trend into your work.

1. Vernacular2. Neutral & universal3. Personality4. The return of flares & serifs5. Colour fonts6. Variable fonts7. Fashion / 8. Trend forecasters

***

6. Fashion
SECTORS: SOCIAL MEDIA, FASHION, BLOGGERS

HOW TO USE THIS TREND: Use fashion-led fonts if it is important to be on-trend. Be careful to stay ahead of the curve as fashions date as quickly as they appear, and may not be appropriate for projects with a longer life-span.

Fashion fonts are ephemeral, often appearing on Instagram, street fashion and music apparel. In 2017 Cooper Black became a brief Instagram sensation and added a touch of 1970s nostalgia to slogan t-shirts. Kanye West took the lettering used by New York street gangs in the 1980s as the inspiration for his ‘Beazley Designs of the Year’ nominated Life of Pablo range.

Read More

What typography trends are forecast for 2018 and how can you use them?
Trend 6. Variable fontsts
By Sarah Hyndman

Part 6 in a series of posts looking at typography trends that we predict will influence graphic design in 2018, and explaining how you can incorporate each trend into your work.

1. Vernacular2. Neutral & universal3. Personality4. The return of flares & serifs5. Colour fonts6. Variable fonts7. Fashion / 8. Trend forecasters

***

6. Variable fonts
SECTOR: DESIGN

HOW TO USE THIS TREND: Variable fonts will enable you to use type in a more flexible way with an infinite range of options within a single font file that will load faster. Keep up to date with developments if you would like to embrace this innovation.


Typo Labs 2018 Brand Identity by Bernd Volmer

Read More

 

What typography trends are forecast for 2018 and how can you use them?
Trend 5. Colour fonts
By Sarah Hyndman

Part 5 in a series of posts looking at typography trends that we predict will influence graphic design in 2018, and explaining how you can incorporate each trend into your work.

1. Vernacular2. Neutral & universal3. Personality4. The return of flares & serifs5. Colour fonts6. Variable fonts7. Fashion / 8. Trend forecasters

***

5. Colour fonts
SECTOR: DESIGN

HOW TO USE THIS TREND: Incorporate layers and colour to add depth, dynamism and innovation to your work. Experiment with type to create dynamic designs that push boundaries.

The rise of the emoji has pushed technology to evolve and enable these colourful symbols to be included in running text. Excitingly, this innovative OpenType-SVG technology now means that it is also possible to place multiple colours, layers and gradients into font files creating colour (or chromatic) fonts on the web. Each layer is assigned its own colour, resulting endless combinations within flowing text. This is technology in its early days, not yet supported across all platforms, but it will evolve quickly as designers explore the possibilities. Typographer and writer Nicole Arnett Phillips (http://www.typographher.com) says, “I think we are in for radical changes (and hopefully some exciting new experimentation/innovation) ahead with these formats”.

Read More

What typography trends are forecast for 2018 and how can you use them?
Trend 4. The return of flares & serifs
By Sarah Hyndman

Part 4 in a series of posts looking at typography trends that we predict will influence graphic design in 2018, and explaining how you can incorporate each trend into your work.

1. Vernacular2. Neutral & universal3. Personality4. The return of flares & serifs5. Colour fonts6. Variable fonts7. Fashion / 8. Trend forecasters

***

4. Serifs
SECTOR: DESIGN

HOW TO USE THIS TREND: Add a flared or a serif typeface to create warmth and convey depth of knowledge.

Flared letterforms and serifs are making a reappearance on the main typographic stage and this is a trend set to continue as the serifs get more pronounced. These have warmth and personality, “I think this is a reaction against the cold, sterile neo-grotesques like Helvetica that seem to be dominating the design landscape.” says Typewolf’s Jeremiah Shoaf. In addition, traditional sign writing has had a resurgence in recent years. As a result the flared styles often created when using a paint brush are increasingly reappearing on the high-street and also being taught to graphic designers in sign writing workshops. Below is the work of London’s Pete Hardwicke featured in Spitalfields Life. Throughout history styles from different mediums have influenced each other, as is also happening with chromatic type (to be featured in trend 6).

Read More