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Vinyl Type: Guess the music genre
We took the Type Tasting record collection along to Letterform Live’s ‘Vinyl’ night with Grafik and Monotype. The record player and vinyl records were set up in the bar as a fun game to play before and after the talks. We invited the audience to guess the music genre from the typeface on the record label, and then to play the record to find out whether they were right. Best played with lashings of beer.

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How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman
How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

How to draw type and Influence People, and why this matters
By Sarah Hyndman
Buy on Amazon
Join us for the book launch at Tate Modern on Friday 21st April from 6 to 8pm.

The new book by Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman is a hands-on activity book that invites you to completely immerse yourself in the world of fonts investigating and hacking them for yourself. Get creative as you learn about typefaces by exploring their shapes using pen and pencil, and do this in your own style so the book becomes uniquely your own. Think of this as life drawing with fonts.

I first fell in love with the shapes of words and letterforms as a child in a sweetshop. I would gaze at the styles and shapes that would literally bring the different flavour experiences to life; knowing which would fizz, melt-in-my-mouth, taste sour and then sweet, or pop explosively and noisily. I would spend hours drawing my own versions of sweet wrappers, and inventing fantastical letterforms that I would then stock in my toy sweet shop to sell to my brother and sister.

It’s one thing to read a description of a typeface; it’s an entirely different experience to pick up a pencil and explore the intricate shapes that make each font unique. In my Type Tasting workshops I find that drawing is an extremely effective way for people to learn about type styles, as I discovered when I was sketching sweet wrappers as a child. This is backed up by science, which shows that hand drawing on paper triggers more of our senses and this multiplies our ability to remember.

There is also a rich tradition of hand drawing type; graphic designers would carefully draw typographic layouts for typesetters to recreate and print before computers were commonplace in the design studio. Doing this gave them an in-depth understanding of the subtle differences between typefaces, and the confidence to work with a wide range of different styles.

My mission is to make typography fun and exciting for everybody, not just experts and academics. I think this is important because type is woven into our everyday lives, especially in today’s Information Age in which so much of the information we receive is what we read. Type styles reflect developments in technology, art movements, changing fashions, popular culture and can document the history of your own life—this is what makes type so exciting.

Whatever your level, from beginner to expert, I would like this book to inspire you to feel excited and more adventurous next time you scroll down the font menu on your computer.

How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

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Archik Siya, Why Fonts MatterShashital Tejusvin, Why Fonts MatterKoshe Prajakta, Why Fonts Matter

Font of Coincidence
This is a story of my trip to teach in India. While I was there I met up with family of friends and discovered, to my surprise, that my book cover had been redesigned by a whole class of students for their typography exam that week.

“The task for our exam was to design the cover for a book called Why Fonts Matter using typography. As I started scribbling out my roughs I thought about what typography is and what it can achieve; every font is different and makes you feel a distinct emotion or connects with you in a certain way.” 

Words by Siya Archik, a second year graphic design student in Mumbai.

I have been studying design for two years and my course is different, unique, insanely creative and fun. But along with the fun comes a lot of hard work; hours and days of work created by hand. We put a great deal of thought into every idea that we execute—to make the final product as attractive and innovative as possible. I chose this course of study because creativity has no boundaries; it is something that lets you express your thoughts and emotions in infinitely creative ways and on any surface.

In our course we study calligraphy & typography; anatomy; packaging, information design and communication design. Each is distinctive in its own way, but all revolve around the same design principles. For the first two years we do everything by hand—from rendering large posters to reproducing the text in a newspaper at actual size, carefully hand-drawing every letter so it is perfect.

Coca Cola design by Siya Archik
Design for a Coca Cola can by Siya Archik.

Our typography assignments vary from kinetic typography to expressive typography and logo design. We research artists who have helped to expand the field of typography to increase our knowledge, and each assignment emphasises the importance of different fonts in our designs, without which they would mean nothing.

I think typography is important because it is required for anything and everything related to design. From creating logos to packaging, all require knowledge of different fonts and how to use them effectively, so as to make our designs stand out from the rest. This makes typography such an integral part of what we do as designers.

During our recent exam week a friend of my family in England, a typographer from London called Sarah Hyndman, came to visit as a guest lecturer at another design college in Mumbai. I was hoping to meet and talk to her about typography but was not sure whether I would have time because I was so busy taking exams.

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Case study: Design thinking with typography workshop

By Sarah Hyndman
Would like to arrange a workshop for your company?

“Opened my mind to using different fonts, and their potential to evoke a reaction” Paul, UX designer.

The Type Tasting studio was the venue for an intensive and energetic daylong workshop. The 16 participants come from the design and web teams of an online business; who have varying levels of design or typography experience and training.

Our initial discussions enabled us to tailor the workshop for the team’s specific needs:
1. Incorporate more experimental thinking at an early stage, instead of focusing on details too early.
2. Become more aware of the wider design world and explore how design touches everything.
3. Be led by design and ideas, not the process or the technology.

These are the key aspects they wished to take away:
1. Have a fun and inspiring day.
2. An appreciation of how design thinking can fundamentally change the way we approach a problem.
3. Make it a habit to go wide at the earlier stages of a project.

The team were great; they threw themselves into the day enthusiastically and excelled at the challenges. The creative sessions proved the most enjoyable as the charcoal flowed freely and the sketched thumbnail designs proliferated.

Psychology of typographyDesign Thinking workshop

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Teaching typography at the Ecole Intuit Lab Mumbai

Sarah Hyndman took Type Tasting to the Ecole Intuit Lab, a design college in Mumbai, India, where she spent a week teaching typography to sixty second and third year students. This is the experience of the week in the words of the students: Neha Godambe, Ruchi Mehta, Shruti Vidyanand, Tvesha Shah and Zahra Dhuliawala.

“The entire week was full of experiences that exposed us to the instinctive nature of humans to judge letterforms. We had an incredibly marvellous time, while actually learning so much more about type. My outlook towards type has changed. I have realised type has something more to say, and now I have started to use a lot more different typefaces.” 

Would like to arrange a Type Tasting course with Sarah Hyndman for your college or organisation?

What did you expect of the typography week?

ZD: ‘Type Tasting’ isn’t exactly a term you hear very often. The uncommonness of the term, however, was most definitely reflected in the week. Until the workshop I think, as a designer, I had seriously underestimated the power of type.

NG: I have always been intrigued by the mysterious ways in which type works. We thought learning about type by trial and error was a mammoth task as we didn’t really connect with it, but as the week passed by this misconception slowly changed.

NG: It turned out that I know a lot about type just based on my intuition and common sense. Even though the games we played were quick and based purely on our instincts, I found I subconsciously created a rationale that supported my answers. In the end it was all about tapping into the psychology of people.

What is unique about Sarah’s approach?

NG: What fascinated me was Sarah’s way of understanding and explaining type. It isn’t just about what type looks like; it is about how it makes you feel. We looked at type in ways that we had never considered before, and we felt it through all our senses.

TS: The week was filled with surprises. There were experiments done in class to see how much type talks to us, the results made it clear that type speaks to us in ways we do not consciously imagine.

ZD: We took part in a series of activities and games, relating to how type affects us psychologically—from associating it with different emotions, to smells and even food.

RM: Through design we learnt psychology and the way our brain and heart react with basic instincts to everything around us, and how every tiny detail influences all the decisions we make.

SV: The history of type was made, for the first time ever, interesting to a class of teenagers.

NG: Sarah has a unique and fun way of putting her point across, which is often through playing games.

Sarah Hyndman teaching typography at the Ecole Intuit Lab Mumbai
Sarah Hyndman teaching typography at the Ecole Intuit Lab Mumbai

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Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions

AVM Curiosities & Type Tasting present
Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions
British Academy Literature Week 2017: Adaptations and Transformations
15th–19th May, 9am to 6pm. Free, drop in, suitable for all.

Lates event
Friday 19th May from 6.30pm to 9.30pm
Free, prior booking is essential

Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions is an interactive sensory exploration of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice created by AVM Curiosities & Type Tasting for the British Academy’s Literature Week. The typography found in editions of this classic novel gives each a different voice. Taking this as the template, the display will use type, sound, sight and scent to serve one story three ways.

AVM Curiosities has been exploring the relationship between art and food through a series of high-calibre events and edible interventions since 2011. Founded by food historian Tasha Marks, AVM Curiosities champions the use of food as an artistic medium, with projects ranging from museum-style exhibitions and sculptural installations to interactive lectures and limited-edition confectionery.
http://www.avmcuriosities.com

Type Tasting’s Sarah Hyndman aims to change the way we think and talk about typography by showing how we interact with it in our everyday lives. She specialises in making the topic accessible with originality, humour and a dash of theatre. Sarah is involved in research into type and perception, she creates interactive events and workshops, and her second book How to Draw Type and Influence People is published in April 2017.
http://www.typetasting.com

 

British Academy
10-11 Carlton House Terrace,
London, SW1Y 5AH

It's Nice That Review of the Year

Goodbye 2016, hello 2017

It’s been quite a year. Thank you to all of you who have been a part of Type Tasting and joined in so enthusiastically. I’ve enjoyed meeting you, and I’m looking forward to the new events planned for next year. Instead of writing a summary of the year I would like to share the interview I recently gave It’s Nice That for their Review of the Year, because the great questions they ask frame the summary perfectly. Below are extracts or you can read the full interview here.

It’s Nice That Review of the Year 2016 
Graphic designer Sarah Hyndman. 

Words by Rebecca Fulleylove.

Our tenth interview for Review of the Year sees us chat to designer Sarah Hyndman about the incredible experiences she’s had this year and the work she continues to do with Type Tasting.

Designer and type champion Sarah Hyndman is on a mission to “prove that typography is fun and engaging for everyone”, and 2016 has seen her take major steps in making that idea a reality. Her work, which takes the form of books, workshops, talks and events, aims to “dispel the myth that type is a dusty subject for academics and experts” and “demonstrate the power of typography”.

What was your creative highlight of 2016?
“Going to Mumbai, India to teach 60 design students… At the end I could see first-hand how my unconventional approach to teaching typography really works.
”

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