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Tag Archives: perception

What is a typographic intervention? What if it’s not what it says on the tin? Can typography alter your experiences, or nudge you to change your behaviour?

This year we are exploring the potential for creating typographic interventions that initiate positive behaviour change. You are invited to take part in typographic research. Some of the experiments you will take part in are in their early proof of concept stages, for others data is being gathered potentially to be published as a future collaborative study.

The Type Tasting Pop-up Typography Lab will be in residence at the D&AD Festival with a series of experiments running throughout the festival designed to gather data, and also to encourage you to think differently about typefaces and perception as you take part in them. Find out more here.

Sarah will be speaking at about the results of this ongoing project at the Museum of Brands on 25th October. This is intended as a conversation starter about the language of enticement vs the voice of authority or guilt, with a view to publishing the results later in the year. The first stages of the explorations have been featured in The Times and iNewspaper.

* Take part in the research online by clicking on the links below *

       

 

 

 

Pop Up Type Tasting Typography Lab
Stoke Newington Literary Festival
2nd & 3rd June, 11am to 8pm, free.
Venue – Locations around the Town Hall

*** NEWS ***
One of the experiments we ran at this event has now been published: The role of typeface curvilinearity on taste expectations and perception by Carlos Velasco, Sarah Hyndman (Type Tasting), Charles Spence (University of Oxford), International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, January 2018.
***

What does a font taste or smell like? Do letterforms convey mood? Can a typeface enhance your experiences? Author Sarah Hyndman invites you to take part in typographic experiments as part of her current research. The mobile laboratory will pop up at various festival locations throughout the weekend. Get location updates on Twitter at #TypeTastingLab.

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Wine & Type Tasting evening

By Sarah Hyndman

Do you Judge a Wine by its Label?
Wine & Type Tasting, 8th December, 7:30pm to 9:30pm, £40 (sold out)
A sellout success at the London Design Festival this year
Book now

“Frankly brilliant idea of combining a type workshop with a wine tasting” It’s Nice That

Are you looking for a winter warming treat with your friends, or a unique and entertaining event for your team and clients? Join us for an innovative type and wine tasting experience and take a journey of discovery through a selection of superb wines as you explore what the design of the label tells you about what you drink.

“I learnt so much while having fun and enjoying delicious wines” A Glimpse of London

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How much does a bottle cost? If it looks expensive will you enjoy it more? What does the type tell you about its provenance? Try your hand at wine and font pairing as you identify the key flavours. Ultimately is the label just there to inform you, or can it transform your tasting experience?

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By Sarah Hyndman

Do You Judge a Wine by its Label?
Would you like us to host a wine & type tasting for your Christmas do? Find out more.

We had a fantastic Wine and Type Tasting event at Laithwaite’s Arch with Bankside Design District for the London Design Festival. Here is a glimpse of the evening, all the photos are by David Owens. There will be a second tasting on Tuesday 27th September and a Christmas one is planned on 8th December. Find out more here. 

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“Surprising and very interesting” Richard, “Fascinating” Cherry, “Illuminating” Piers, “Intriguing” Clare, “Very different but rewarding” Lee, “Fun and informative” Sara, “Really interesting! Surprisingly scientific” Rachael, “It was fabulous, surprising and delicious!” Syd.

“More than an excuse for weeknight drinking, wine was a clever example of the influence of typeface … don’t worry; you don’t need to be a typography nerd” Digital Arts

“It was certainly an eye-opener to realise that so much of what we taste is influenced by our other senses” SEEN London

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Wine and Type Tasting with Sarah Hyndman   Wine and Type Tasting with Sarah Hyndman   Wine and Type Tasting with Sarah Hyndman

 

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All American Survey Image-truthful

Can typefaces represent values such as liberty, equality and truth? 

You gather a great deal of meaning about the words a person says from their tone of voice. Are they happy, truthful, authentic? Typefaces/fonts influence your interpretation of the words you read in a similar way. When the font and words are in harmony you are more likely to trust them. When they don’t match the words can feel less authentic.

Equality

This is a new survey exploring which fonts best communicate some of the core American values taken from the Declaration of Independence. Very early results are in (you can see them at the end of the survey), although not enough people have yet taken part for these to be meaningful. Full results will be published when enough people have taken part. Do you think your answers will match the majority?

Click here to take the survey, you will see the early results at the end.

 

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The World’s Most Expensive-looking Font Might Surprise You
By Madeleine Morley for AIGA

When you hear the word “luxury,” it’s easy to conjure up the colors gold, silver, and velvety purple; yet when it comes to typography, what we associate with wealth is less clear-cut. For the ancient Greeks, rare and precious purple ink came from sea snails found deep in the ocean, a dye so difficult to obtain it was reserved for kings. We don’t mine the sea for letters of the alphabet though, so what’s the typeface equivalent of purple ink, the fanciest looking font?

Writer and typographer Sarah Hyndman, whose last book explored the tastes we associate with different fonts, investigated the relationship between typography and cost in her latest survey at the V&A in London. Hyndman sought to find out whether a font can truly make a product appear more expensive, and also whether certain typographic characteristics have been consigned to the bargain bin.

After surveying over 368 people, the results suggest that bold typefaces with rounder terminals appear cheaper, whereas lighter weights, serifs, and contrasts are rated appear more expensive, with the modern Didot selected as the diamond of all fonts. This is perhaps, unsurprising; the serif is associated with fashion and you can find it on the mastheads of magazines like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

Read the full article here…

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