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What is a typographic intervention? What if it’s not what it says on the tin? Can typography alter your experiences, or nudge you to change your behaviour?

This year we are exploring the potential for creating typographic interventions that initiate positive behaviour change. You are invited to take part in typographic research. Some of the experiments you will take part in are in their early proof of concept stages, for others data is being gathered potentially to be published as a future collaborative study.

The Type Tasting Pop-up Typography Lab will be in residence at the D&AD Festival with a series of experiments running throughout the festival designed to gather data, and also to encourage you to think differently about typefaces and perception as you take part in them. Find out more here.

Sarah will be speaking at about the results of this ongoing project at the Museum of Brands on 25th October. This is intended as a conversation starter about the language of enticement vs the voice of authority or guilt, with a view to publishing the results later in the year. The first stages of the explorations have been featured in The Times and iNewspaper.

* Take part in the research online by clicking on the links below *

       

 

 

 

eat your words cover

Eat your Words: Food as a System of Communication and its role in a Post-culinary Society.

Sarah Hyndman, MA Typo/graphic Studies Thesis, February 2001 (Distinction). London College of Communication, University of the Arts London.

Author’s note on the ‘post-culinary society’ of 2000/2001: At the time of writing there were concerns about the rise in popularity of convenience food and a generation who had not been taught how to cook. However, Jamie Oliver had just published The Naked Chef and Britain was soon to fall in love with cooking again.

Eat Your Words illustration of iced biscuits

“The ideal celebratory meal had a structure that started off with an appetising hot and messy dish of gravy over meat and potatoes (without which a meal is not a dinner), and became more of an architectural achievement as it went on through pudding (on a smaller plate), and tea with an optional small coloured biscuit (on a still smaller plate).” Michael Nicod

final piece

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