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By Sarah Hyndman

The new book by Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman will be published by Laurence King Publishing on 17th April 2017. This is an activity book that gathers up typefaces into themes such as ‘Fonts of knowledge’, ‘Rebellious types’ and the ‘Wild Wild West’. Each chapter starts with an illustrated type sampler and then takes you through exercises that teach the origins of the typefaces and give you space to draw them for yourselves. Here’s a link to pre-order, it on Amazon, and keep an eye out for launch events and book signings nearer the time.

‘How to Draw Type and Influence People’ is written and illustrated by Sarah Hyndman. “This brand new book provides an exciting and interactive way to learn about typography. Packed with fun creative exercises to help you discover your own style and create new typefaces” Laurence King.

Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People

diary-typographicrebellion

By Sarah Hyndman

Learn, socialise & create
Typographic Rebellion Workshop
Three hour workshop and talk
The workshop can be held at a venue of your choice, or up to 15 can be accommodated in the Type Tasting Studio, The Chocolate Factory, London N16 7SX.

Type Tasting Learn, socialise & create sessions take a typeface or type style and explore it in the context of popular culture and history to reveal the meanings beyond the letterforms.

Refuel your team’s creativity with hands-on letterform exploration as they roll up their sleeves for a fast paced and fun session away from the computer, experimenting with typography.

Explore how typography can be used to give angst and rebellion a voice, and how you can use type to ensure that YOUR message is heard. You will learn from recent history how typefaces both articulate and document change, and what an important role they have played. From the anti-establishment angst of Punk, the placards of the miners’ strikes of the 1980s, the wine industry’s seismic shift through language and design, to the successful presidential campaigns in the USA.

15 mins Mingle and relax whilst playing a couple of classic Type Tasting games.
45 mins Typographic rebellion talk by Sarah Hyndman.
90 mins Hands-on creative session exploring rebellious type and lettering.
30 mins Display work, finish with questions and a prize raffle.

Outcomes
• Enjoy a social and creative team building session in a relaxed, informal environment.
• Get away from the computer to explore a range of markmaking tools inventively and playfully. Research shows that writing and drawing by hand promotes creative idea generation and memory.
• Explore different type styles and letterforms, and how these can be used in an expressive way.
• This is a creative thinking refresher—a reminder of how to think creatively and on our feet without the preconceptions of the final outcome.

Interviews with Sarah Hyndman
How to start a revolution with Comic Sans Dazed & Confused magazine interview
Punk was the anti-Helvetica Design Week interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman

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dazed-burger

By Sarah Hyndman

I chatted to Louis Bradley of Dazed and Confused Magazine about typographic rebellion and how the ultimate way to rebel against the increasing ubiquity of the sans serif might be to use fonts that provoke a reaction like Comic Sans or Papyrus.

“How to start a revolution with Comic Sans. Could something as simple as font have been the catalyst for the spread of punk or behind Donald Trump’s win? We explore the hidden power of typeface”

The idea that something as simple as typeface can be an integral part of a protest movement might sound a bit far-fetched. But the role of fonts is just as important as actual words in communicating a message to the masses. It’s why you don’t ever stray too far away from Arial or Times New Roman on your CV – you don’t want to come across as too much of an avant-garde loose canon by opting for Lucida Handwriting or Bradley Hand. Or why you don’t commonly use curly script-like letters for your uni essays.

Sarah Hyndman creates workshops and events designed to teach the art of typography and deconstruct the power of design. The ‘Never Mind The Typography’ exhibition outlines how the angst and rebellion of punk was expressed in every fibre of the counterculture, even right down to the lettering. “When punk (and its typeface) arrived in the mid-70s, the design at that point in time was very traditional and old-fashioned, kind of nostalgic and backwards looking,” she explains. It was this reaction to the rigid restrictions of modernism that gave birth to a whole new movement in innovative design. Cast your mind back to the creator of the ransom note style and the Sex Pistols logo Jamie Reid, and the slick layered graphics on British Independent album sleeves created by Barney Bubbles, who also designed the logo for NME magazine. “With all of this comes the layering of meanings, layering of images, often lots of references and subtexts that were put in so you had to be in the know to understand the references. You know from that type style that the album is going to be in a certain rebellious underground – it’s going to have swearing in it, basically.”

Read the full article in Dazed…

Punk was the anti-Helvetica Design Week interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman

 

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By Sarah Hyndman

Are you looking for a Christmas gift for the design savvy person in your life? Why Fonts Matter by Sarah Hyndman (Penguin/Random House) is a colourful journey through type and fonts ideal for both designers and non-designers. If you would like a gift tag signed by the author to accompany your present for that personalised touch, email sarah(a)typetasting.com a UK address and a message and this will be posted to you*.
Purchase a copy from Amazon UK

starstarstarstarstar
Fun” “Brilliant” “Inspiring” “Eye-candy” “Enlightening
Read all Amazon UK reviews.
It’s Nice ThatSunday Brunch, New York Times
A fascinating insight into how type can influence our feelings, our senses, and even our taste” Professor Charles Spence, University of Oxford.

Look inside Why Fonts Matter

You can also bring a copy of Why Fonts Matter to the Open Studios Weekend at the Chocolate Factory N16 in London in 26th & 27th November from 11am to 6pm. Find out more.

*Before 10th December.

Wine & Type Tasting evening

By Sarah Hyndman

Do you Judge a Wine by its Label?
Wine & Type Tasting, 8th December, 7:30pm to 9:30pm, £30 (sold out)
A sellout success at the London Design Festival this year
Book now

“Frankly brilliant idea of combining a type workshop with a wine tasting” It’s Nice That

Are you looking for a winter warming treat with your friends, or a unique and entertaining event for your team and clients? Join us for an innovative type and wine tasting experience and take a journey of discovery through a selection of superb wines as you explore what the design of the label tells you about what you drink.

“I learnt so much while having fun and enjoying delicious wines” A Glimpse of London

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How much does a bottle cost? If it looks expensive will you enjoy it more? What does the type tell you about its provenance? Try your hand at wine and font pairing as you identify the key flavours. Ultimately is the label just there to inform you, or can it transform your tasting experience?

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Typography as the voice of change

By Sarah Hyndman

Find out how typography gave the angst and rebellion of Punk a voice, and how you can use fonts to ensure that YOUR message is heard. 

Punk changed graphic design¹. When it first exploded in the 1970s it appeared to be youthful rebellion. However, looking back we now consider it to be an important part of the Postmodernist movement, which began as a reaction to the rigid restrictions of Modernism. Punk’s DIY ethos encapsulated the anti-establishment mood of the mid 1970s: a time of ongoing economic hardship, with social fragmentation, an economy struggling to recover from a stock market crash, housing problems and increasing unemployment. This was a decade facing a clash of expectations as both the economy and society struggled to cope with the pace of change as the rose-tinted nostalgia of the past collided with a seemingly out-of-control vision of the future. Sound familiar?

Punk was an empowering time of do-it-yourself, when the message truly became the medium as everybody took up their scissors and glue to create zines, posters, flyers and record sleeves (this was pre-Mac). These were often mass produced on the photocopier in the local library and stapled together by hand—not designed and typeset by professionals. What made Punk’s voice stand out was its difference; it literally broke all the typesetting rules by cutting up the grid and throwing the words back down on the page in a haphazard chaos of styles.

Do you have a message that you want the World to listen to? It’s not just what you say, it’s also the way you say it that will create maximum impact and ensure that your message is heard. Context is key. In 2008 Obama’s presidential ‘Change’ campaign² looked so different to the political typographic landscape in the US at the time, that it literally embodied the theme of change. It did this while also conveying trust, confidence and experience, not idealistic rhetoric.

Craig Oldham documents the miners’ strikes of the 1980s “a historical movement of the working class people”. He shows how the placards distributed by the LCDTU trade union use distinct geometric forms that are “bold and direct in the sea of visual noise that is a mass demonstration”. These letterforms mirror the immediacy and anger of the miners’ hand-written placards, and they also give the miners a unified voice³.

Roboto, Google typeface Segoe, Microsoft typeface San Francisco, Apple typeface

The typography of social media and apps today is of corporate and minimalist sans serif typefaces* that, to the untrained eye, look very similar to each other (above), all contained within a structured grid. There are few opportunities to use type expressively, hence the rise of the emoji. Snapchat is a platform that enables you to customise your words (in any font you want, provided it’s Avenir), and their fleeting 10-second life span encourages a DIY approach that breaks them out of the homogeneity of the social networks.

A typeface gives your cause or movement a recognisable voice that inspires ideas, ensures your message is heard, and empowers your words to make a difference. Looking at the voices of change and rebellion in the context of history reveals the full impact they had at the time, and demonstrates how you can use a font as a catalyst for change.

Would you like to find out more?

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Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People

Sarah Hyndman will be opening the doors of the Type Tasting studio at the Chocolate Factory N16 for Winter Open Studios Weekend on Saturday 26th and Sunday 27th November, when all the studios will be open. The studio will be crammed with all things typography and letter related, including prints, drawings and Christmas gifts. Sarah will talk about ‘Why Fonts Matter’ and give you an exclusive preview of the illustrations for her next book ‘How to Draw Type and Influence People’, to be published by Laurence King next year. Bring along a copy of a book if you would like it signed for somebody as a Christmas gift, and hear about the workshops and events such as Wine and Type Tasting evenings.

Open Studios Weekend
Type Tasting Studio F7
Saturday 26th and Sunday 27th November from 11am to 6pm
Chocolate Factory N16
Farleigh Place (off Farleigh Road)
London N16 7SX

Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type and Influence People

Are you buying a Christmas gift for the design savvy person in your life? The Chocolate Factory’s Sarah Hyndman will sign copies of her book Why Fonts Matter (Penguin/Random House) at Open Studios Weekend. Click here to read Amazon reviews and purchase a copy in advance.

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