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How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman
How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

How to draw type and Influence People, and why this matters
By Sarah Hyndman
Buy on Amazon
Join us for the book launch at Tate Modern on Friday 21st April from 6 to 8pm.

The new book by Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman is a hands-on activity book that invites you to completely immerse yourself in the world of fonts investigating and hacking them for yourself. Get creative as you learn about typefaces by exploring their shapes using pen and pencil, and do this in your own style so the book becomes uniquely your own. Think of this as life drawing with fonts.

I first fell in love with the shapes of words and letterforms as a child in a sweetshop. I would gaze at the styles and shapes that would literally bring the different flavour experiences to life; knowing which would fizz, melt-in-my-mouth, taste sour and then sweet, or pop explosively and noisily. I would spend hours drawing my own versions of sweet wrappers, and inventing fantastical letterforms that I would then stock in my toy sweet shop to sell to my brother and sister.

It’s one thing to read a description of a typeface; it’s an entirely different experience to pick up a pencil and explore the intricate shapes that make each font unique. In my Type Tasting workshops I find that drawing is an extremely effective way for people to learn about type styles, as I discovered when I was sketching sweet wrappers as a child. This is backed up by science, which shows that hand drawing on paper triggers more of our senses and this multiplies our ability to remember.

There is also a rich tradition of hand drawing type; graphic designers would carefully draw typographic layouts for typesetters to recreate and print before computers were commonplace in the design studio. Doing this gave them an in-depth understanding of the subtle differences between typefaces, and the confidence to work with a wide range of different styles.

My mission is to make typography fun and exciting for everybody, not just experts and academics. I think this is important because type is woven into our everyday lives, especially in today’s Information Age in which so much of the information we receive is what we read. Type styles reflect developments in technology, art movements, changing fashions, popular culture and can document the history of your own life—this is what makes type so exciting.

Whatever your level, from beginner to expert, I would like this book to inspire you to feel excited and more adventurous next time you scroll down the font menu on your computer.

How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman How to Draw Type & Influence People by Sarah Hyndman

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What's Your Type?

What’s Your Type?

The one-hour workshops taking place on Wednesday 21st September for the London Design Festival are fun and intensive sessions in which you will explore typefaces and what they communicate independently of the words they spell out. You will create your own tasting notes to take home along with a certificate, and we are delighted to have spot prize tickets to the Museum of Brands and type specimens from type foundry Fontsmith.

Read more about the workshop.
BOOK NOW.

Museum of Brands tickets

What's Your Type?   mob3
We are all type consumers and letterforms are woven into the rituals of our lives through the packaging on the products that we use every day. At the time we may pay little attention as the logos and product names are so familiar that we reach for them almost unconsciously. Take a trip to a supermarket and, instead of shopping, look at the packaging as if it is on show in a design museum.

The Museum of Brands in West London contains a time tunnel that documents the history of packaging, revealing the trends and fashions in type decade by decade for over a century.

What's Your Type?
What's Your Type?
The Museum of Brands has kindly given us tickets to the museum to give away as spot prizes during the workshop, visiting the museum is a great way to explore the type we consume every day.

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All American Survey Image-truthful

Can typefaces represent values such as liberty, equality and truth? 

You gather a great deal of meaning about the words a person says from their tone of voice. Are they happy, truthful, authentic? Typefaces/fonts influence your interpretation of the words you read in a similar way. When the font and words are in harmony you are more likely to trust them. When they don’t match the words can feel less authentic.

Equality

This is a new survey exploring which fonts best communicate some of the core American values taken from the Declaration of Independence. Very early results are in (you can see them at the end of the survey), although not enough people have yet taken part for these to be meaningful. Full results will be published when enough people have taken part. Do you think your answers will match the majority?

Click here to take the survey, you will see the early results at the end.

 

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The World’s Most Expensive-looking Font Might Surprise You
By Madeleine Morley for AIGA

When you hear the word “luxury,” it’s easy to conjure up the colors gold, silver, and velvety purple; yet when it comes to typography, what we associate with wealth is less clear-cut. For the ancient Greeks, rare and precious purple ink came from sea snails found deep in the ocean, a dye so difficult to obtain it was reserved for kings. We don’t mine the sea for letters of the alphabet though, so what’s the typeface equivalent of purple ink, the fanciest looking font?

Writer and typographer Sarah Hyndman, whose last book explored the tastes we associate with different fonts, investigated the relationship between typography and cost in her latest survey at the V&A in London. Hyndman sought to find out whether a font can truly make a product appear more expensive, and also whether certain typographic characteristics have been consigned to the bargain bin.

After surveying over 368 people, the results suggest that bold typefaces with rounder terminals appear cheaper, whereas lighter weights, serifs, and contrasts are rated appear more expensive, with the modern Didot selected as the diamond of all fonts. This is perhaps, unsurprising; the serif is associated with fashion and you can find it on the mastheads of magazines like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

Read the full article here…

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census cover wide LR-secrets

It’s long been understood that we recognise the personality types of different fonts:

Can a font have a guilty secret when nobody’s looking?
If it was a pair of shoes what would they be?
What job would it do for a living?

There’s a great deal of interest in the personalities of fonts, what we associate different styles with and how they influence what we read. But has anybody asked your opinion, as a font consumer?

We think this is important so we’ve created the Font Census to collect information about our relationships with the fonts we encounter every day—from the reader’s point of view.

Click here to take part in the Font Census and tell us what YOU think.

DEFAULT … LEGIBLE … SERIF … BORING … OPEN … ENGLISH … ROBUST … HONEST … CLASSIC … GENTLEMAN … PROUD … NOT A COMEDY FONT … AN ACCOUNTANT IN A SUIT … CONTEMPORARY … THE SERIOUS FONT … QUINTESSENTIALLY BRITISH … ANONYMOUS … BECOMING QUITE COOL AGAIN … SPEAKS CLEARLY AND PRONOUNCES ITSELF WITH INTENT … IMPORTANT MILESTONE IN NEWSPAPER DESIGN HISTORY … FEEL OF AUTHORITY … DESIGNED FOR READERS NOT DESIGNERS …

What’s the typeface being described?

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