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• Psychology

“If you see a “danger” sign written in the Comic Sans typeface, would you pay attention to the warning? What does Times New Roman taste like? Is a lemon fast or slow?” Paul Bignell for i Newspaper.

“These questions probably haven’t crossed your mind – indeed, they may make no sense at all. But in the studio of typographic artist Sarah Hyndman, they are vital. Here, art prints mingle with old bottles plastered with labels that say “Eat Me” in an elaborate font. It’s a cross between a science lab, a trendy artists’ hub and an old curiosity shoppe. There are Helvetica water biscuits in jars (I’m told not to eat them as they are well past their sell-by date), 1950s Coca-Cola bottles in a display case and a rack of test tubes with a strange-looking pink liquid at the bottom.”

“Stealth health – it’s all in the font Hyndman understands that you couldn’t convince chocolate manufacturers to change how they work. However, through the power of fonts, she believes there is scope for approaching the healthier end of the food market by stealth, by giving these companies the same tools as those that sell unhealthy products.”

Read the extended online i Newspaper article here…

“Some believe that smaller chocolate bars and sweets are the answer, others want a tax on sugary drinks or to encourage children to be more active. One expert, however, has come up with a novel solution to child obesity.

Sarah Hyndman, a graphic designer, says that the right typefaces can “nudge” people into healthier food choices, and this should start in schools…”

The article references the food can experiment that ran at the recent book launch at Tate Modern, and at the Type Tasting event at Shoreditch House for the D&AD Fringe Festival, were you there?

Q&A at Letterform Live

The theme of Grafik’s Letterform Live this week was ‘Experimental’, and it was an exciting evening to be a part of. My aim for the evening was to bring a bit of ‘bonkers and magic’ at a time of so much anxiety. We filled the bar with jellybeans and asked the 130 audience members to guess each flavour from the style of the typeface on the label. If you weren’t at the event you can still take part in this experiment here.

Jelly beans at Letterform Live Jelly beans at Letterform Live

I spoke about how amazing the human brain is for the skilful way it creates a ‘sub-programme’ to perform the complex task of reading, which your subconscious performs automatically. Your eyes simply glance over a series of marks in a huge array of shapes and sizes and—as if by magic—stories, ideas, memories, songs, smells are conjured up right there in your mind.

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All American Survey Image-truthful

Can typefaces represent values such as liberty, equality and truth? 

You gather a great deal of meaning about the words a person says from their tone of voice. Are they happy, truthful, authentic? Typefaces/fonts influence your interpretation of the words you read in a similar way. When the font and words are in harmony you are more likely to trust them. When they don’t match the words can feel less authentic.

Equality

This is a new survey exploring which fonts best communicate some of the core American values taken from the Declaration of Independence. Very early results are in (you can see them at the end of the survey), although not enough people have yet taken part for these to be meaningful. Full results will be published when enough people have taken part. Do you think your answers will match the majority?

Click here to take the survey, you will see the early results at the end.

 

Creative Review Creative Review

In celebration of the official launch of Why Fonts Matter in the US today: Creative Review ran a piece on the pop-up Type Tasting at the V&A for the London Design Festival. “Type Tasting’s series of multisensory experiments, for me, turned typography on its head.” Natalie Kelter

Creative Review
A taste of type, Natalie Kelter

creative review logo 2up 300

(Photos David Owens)

 

Wired

In celebration of the official launch of Why Fonts Matter in the US today: Liz Stinson from Wired played the Type Dating Game via Skype. “20 percent of women said they’d pick Franklin Gothic as their typographic beau, the winner by a landslide. I know it sounds weird.”

Wired
If You Love That Font So Much, Why Don’t You Date It?
By Liz Stinson

wired logo LR

 

CNN CNN

In celebration of the official publication of Why Fonts Matter in the US today we’re looking back over articles and interviews that give a glimpse of the impression we’ve made on the world at large.

Jake Wallis Simons from CNN came to the Type Tasting studio and played a selection of Type Tasting Games. “As bizarre as it sounds, my job is to match up the bottles and fonts using only my sense of smell.”

CNN
What’s your type of lover? How fonts could help you find the perfect date
By Jake Wallis Simons