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The making of the fire and ice ‘A’s.

The ice ‘A’ was an idea I had while walking along on a hot summer day, I was thirsty and really fancied an ice lolly. I started by building a 20 x 20cm silicon mold created by pouring the model making mixture over a cardboard reconstruction. This was then filled with water and fruit and left to set in the freezer (which took the best part of a weekend). I photographed it myself in my studio by suspending on fishing twine, back lit against a black background. The photo shoot had to be quick as I used a hairdryer to make the ice shiny, but this also meant that the ‘A’ melted quickly. Then it was just a case of Photoshopping out the twine and any background clutter.

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“The next typeface you use, what would it taste like?” was the question I posed at the end of the talk on Edible Typography at Eye Magazine’s Type Tuesday. Here are some of the suggestions…

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Angela Lamb’s first typeface of the day was Lavanderia which she describes as “delicate – it tastes of spun sugar. sweet, but brittle”. Lavenderia is designed by James T. Edmondson and is based on lettering found on Laundromat windows of San Francisco’s Mission District.

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Karina Monger and the Ferrier Pearce design team came up with the following list:

Museo: Bacon wheat crunchies

Arial Rounded: Spaghetti

WC Roughtrad: Flaky Pastry…

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Baskerville Earl Grey tea biscuits recipe
Edible typography
Using food to describe the experience of typography

Baskerville is a transitional serif typeface that sits between the old style serif typefaces of William Caslon and the modern serifs created by Giambattista Bodoni & Firmin Didot. English printer and type designer John Baskerville developed a typeface with more defined angles and greater stroke contrast. This was a refined face with improved legibility which also took advantage of the improvements in technology happening in the 1750s. Baskerville is a recognisably English typeface that has stood the test of time as a legible, everyday text face.

My interpretation of Baskerville are Earl Grey tea biscuits for an authentic eighteenth century flavour. At this time improved technology and transport allowed foods to be enjoyed throughout the country. Tea had become the national drink and the tea leaves would be dried, rolled and used again. I had initially thought that Baskerville should be savoury, since it’s an everyday ‘jobbing’ typeface, but sweet biscuits tasted better.

Recipe

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Helvetica water biscuits recipe
Edible typography
Using food to describe the experience of typography

The typeface Helvetica was created to be neutral and to have great clarity, but to have no intrinsic meaning of its own. It was intended that it could communicate any message, but without it being influenced by the style of the font in any way. i.e. clear enough to be used across a wide range of applications, but plain and neutral enough that that its sole purpose is to support the message.

My interpretation of Helvetica is to create it from savoury water biscuits which are plain enough that they can be included in a wide range of meals but take on the flavour and style of the food that they accompany. They have a sprinkling of salt to make them tasty enough to eat, and a dash of rosemary for a Swiss Alpine touch. Serve them with cheese, ham or a tasty dip.

Recipe

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me talking by JLW

Here at Type Tasting I’ve been having conversations about how we respond to different typefaces. Whether we’re type designers, graphic designers or nothing to do with the design industry, all of us are type consumers. We interact with typefaces constantly in our everyday lives and, although it happens on an instinctive level, when we read a word the font affects us.

In the film short Font Men, type designer Jonathan Hoefler from type foundry H+FJ explains how he and Tobias Frere-Jones feel there’s a “poverty of descriptive terms” for the experience of typography and instead they use qualitative terms that are purely descriptive or that “reference cultural milestones”. He gives the example of describing a typeface as being “too Steven Segal and not Steve McQueen enough”.

I’ve found that an effective parallel is to use food as a way to describe the experience of typography. Doing this has started a well debated conversation and introduced a lexicon of sensory descriptions and metaphors. It interests me that, although the discussions revolve around food, they still sound authentically ‘typography’ and reveal a great deal about our experiences with fonts.

I was invited to talk about this at the recent Type Tuesday at St Bride hosted by Eye Magazine on the topic of Food and Design, the theme of the current issue of Eye. The main speaker was North’s Sean Perkins who took us on an inspiring tour of North’s design for food and hospitality. David Lane and Marina Tweed spoke about creating new alternative food magazine The Gourmand. I explained that Type Tasting began as my ‘grown up gap year’ and was initially based on the idea of wine tastings. I talked about the edible typography project and how it had come about, taking the audience through the ideas behind some of the recipes. After the panel discussion I handed out the edible Helvetica, Baskerville and Futura that I’d baked earlier and answered questions.

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Top: Sarah Hyndman talking edible typography under a photo of the font Impact made from dark chocolate and chilli, photo by Eye Magazine.

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A day of baking edible fonts for Type Tuesday hosted by Eye Magazine at St Brides on Tuesday April 1st. I’m one of the speakers and I’ll be explaining how my edible type is all about starting conversations about typography around how different fonts evoke associations. I’ll be bringing the freshly baked biscuits with me.

Above is Futura in progress: sweet & brightly coloured cookies, coloured icing if I have time. Below are Baskerville in progress: tea infused biscuits for authentic 1700s flavour, and Helvetica in progress: plain water biscuits with a dash of rosemary & salt. If you have any ideas or comments please join the conversation with @TypeTasting on Twitter.

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