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Vetements, Brioni and Kanye Agree: It’s Gothic Time
New York Times, August 9th
By Max Berlinger

“It’s been used for some of the most sacred texts in the Western world,” said Michael Bierut, a partner at the design firm Pentagram and a senior critic at the Yale School of Art. “At the same time, it’s used by biker gangs, street gangs, heavy-metal groups and death-metal groups. It seems like Satan has come to own it more than God.”

Thanks to its longevity, the typeface has accrued a wide range of cultural associations and the versatility to convey both a sense of reverential authority and rebellion. “I think there’s always that double edge, a duality that goes on in everything,” said Sarah Hyndman, the author of “Why Fonts Matter.”

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Read the full article.

 

AIGA Eye on Design

How Type Can Tell the History of Your City
A London designer leads a tour of her neighborhood signage
By Ellen Himelfarb for AIGA’s Eye on Design.

**BOOK HERE for the final two Dalston Type Safaris taking place this year**

“On a recent Tuesday evening, I followed Sarah Hyndman around Dalston, one of London’s most creative and fast-gentrifying neighborhoods. Her so-called Dalston Type Safari hadn’t sounded like the most exotic endeavor, to this local, at least. It resembled a safari insofar as we roamed among native creatures, some growling to themselves, and kept alert for dangerous beasts of the wheeled variety.

“Yet Hyndman, author of Why Fonts Matter and an expert on the psychology of typefaces, came armed with vast amounts of wisdom (and a tote stuffed with gummy treats, popcorn, and hand-pressed postcards, lending it all a staycation vibe). I think we all came away as enlightened as if we’d been abroad and back.”

Read the full article…

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Q&A at Letterform Live

The theme of Grafik’s Letterform Live this week was ‘Experimental’, and it was an exciting evening to be a part of. My aim for the evening was to bring a bit of ‘bonkers and magic’ at a time of so much anxiety. We filled the bar with jellybeans and asked the 130 audience members to guess each flavour from the style of the typeface on the label. If you weren’t at the event you can still take part in this experiment here.

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I spoke about how amazing the human brain is for the skilful way it creates a ‘sub-programme’ to perform the complex task of reading, which your subconscious performs automatically. Your eyes simply glance over a series of marks in a huge array of shapes and sizes and—as if by magic—stories, ideas, memories, songs, smells are conjured up right there in your mind.

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All American Survey Image-truthful

Can typefaces represent values such as liberty, equality and truth? 

You gather a great deal of meaning about the words a person says from their tone of voice. Are they happy, truthful, authentic? Typefaces/fonts influence your interpretation of the words you read in a similar way. When the font and words are in harmony you are more likely to trust them. When they don’t match the words can feel less authentic.

Equality

This is a new survey exploring which fonts best communicate some of the core American values taken from the Declaration of Independence. Very early results are in (you can see them at the end of the survey), although not enough people have yet taken part for these to be meaningful. Full results will be published when enough people have taken part. Do you think your answers will match the majority?

Click here to take the survey, you will see the early results at the end.

 

Creative Review Creative Review

In celebration of the official launch of Why Fonts Matter in the US today: Creative Review ran a piece on the pop-up Type Tasting at the V&A for the London Design Festival. “Type Tasting’s series of multisensory experiments, for me, turned typography on its head.” Natalie Kelter

Creative Review
A taste of type, Natalie Kelter

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(Photos David Owens)