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This is the third and final instalment reviewing Type Tasting in 2017: judging, the Type Tasting pop-up lab, publications and interviews.

Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman has continued her mission to make typography relevant and engaging beyond the world of design, and continues to work on proof-of-concept ideas to show that design can create positive change. She has judged design awards, the Type Tasting pop-up lab has continued to gather data, both her latest book and a new collaborative study have been published and she has appeared in interviews from The Times to Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch.

Judging
Sarah has been involved with the D&AD for a number of years; as a judge for their professional and student design awards, and as a bespoke typography course lead. She continues to work with students and was delighted to be invited to judge the Penguin student book cover awards this year.

• D&AD professional design awards 2017 (Yellow Pencil: Type Voice by Ogilvy New York)
• Penguin student book cover awards 2017 (winner: Madalyn Farley, Kingston University)

Pop-up Lab
Sarah has been researching perception of typefaces and multisensory typography for four years, both online and at events. The Type Tasting pop-up lab has appeared at a number of events this year to gather data both for scientific studies and a future book that Sarah will begin writing next year. Thank you to everybody who has taken part.

• Oxford Symposium (Hacking flavour perception: Design, technology, & gastrophysics)
• Stoke Newington Literary Festival
• Tate Modern
• Victoria & Albert Museum
• Shoreditch House

“A fascinating insight into how type can influence our feelings, our senses, and even our taste” Professor Charles Spence, University of Oxford

Published
The second of Sarah’s books were published this year, with a well-attended launch event at the Tate Modern and an appearance on Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch as their typography expert.
How to Draw Type & Influence People: An Activity Book by Sarah Hyndman, Laurence King Publishing. D&AD illustration award entry.

The latest collaborative study with Professor Charles Spence of the Crossmodal Research Laboratory at the University of Oxford has also been accepted for publication, this is the first to use data gathered by the pop-up lab earlier in the year.
The role of typeface curvilinearity on taste expectations and perception’ by Carlos Velasco, Sarah Hyndman (Type Tasting) & Professor Charles Spence (Department of Experimental Psychology, University Oxford), 2018, International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science.

Interviews and appearances
A selection of interviews from live television to ones printed in real, inky newspapers.
• Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch interview
• Monocle Weekly Radio interview
• i Newspaper ‘Just your type: Can the science behind the subconscious influences of different fonts be harnessed to make us think and eat differently?’
It’s Nice That ‘“Type alters what you smell” and other insights from Sarah Hyndman’s latest type-based research
The Times ‘Using right fonts on labels could tackle obesity’
Design Week ‘It’s easy to see typography as an invisible discipline’
The Guardian ‘Just my type: how Cooper Black became 2017’s most fashionable font’
Total Film ‘Type Cast. What does a film poster’s typography tell us?’
Grafik Magazine ‘Unknown Pleasures’
The Bookseller ‘Type Tasting’

Would you like to commission a talk, workshop or event?
Get in touch with Sarah Hyndman

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This is the second instalment reviewing Type Tasting in 2017: corporate workshops, sponsored workshops and drop-in events (read part 3 here).

This year Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman has created workshops and events for a range of dynamic and innovative clients. Workshops have taken place at adidas HQ in Germany, for Design Thinkers in Toronto and at Tate Modern. Sessions have been created to launch the new BumbleBizz app with a workshop for entrepreneurs, as a teambuilding ‘Fight Club’ evening at WGSN, at the Wellcome Collection and for the D&AD.

Corporate workshops
Sarah trains communications agency teams how to better connect with their audiences through understanding the psychology of typography and communication, often with a design thinking challenge built into the session. All sessions are participatory and hands-on, packed with games and activities that invite participants to become a part of the discovery process

• adidas HQ Germany
• Frukt
• Hodder
• RMIT Melbourne
• Springett’s
• Totally Money
• WGSN

“The trainer was absolutely amazing! Such an interesting person who is obviously so passionate about what she does. Lots of short activities to figure things out for ourselves. Very interactive, loved all the visual elements and the games” WGSN

“I’ve often found typography intimidating. However, your research made it relatable, exciting and really quite funny. We were all buzzing after your workshop” Isabel Doraisamy, RMIT Melbourne

“Really interesting—like a mini TED talk with activities” WGSN

Sponsored workshops and drop-in events

Sarah teaches entrepreneurs how to use fonts to communicate their brand and how to create their own visual voice on social media.
She also creates masterclasses, break-out sessions and pre/post talk activities. Participants are guided through the layers of an experience that will inform, entertain, and engage their curiosity. Preconceptions and assumptions are questioned and activities are created to tell the story of a brand or product experience.

• BumbleBizz Launch event
• Design Thinkers Toronto for Monotype
• Letterform Live #VinylType for Monotype
• Shoreditch House for the D&AD Festival
• Tate Modern book launch event for Laurence King
• V&A Museum for the London Design Festival
• Wellcome ‘Language Lab’ workshop
• Wellcome: Type Triage activity and display

“Tasting, smelling, listening to and even saying type! Mind blowing workshop” Sally Henderson, Micklegate Design

“So interesting, so brilliantly delivered and such a clever structure. My D&AD festival highlight” Ruth Yearley, Partner. Direct or Of Insight & Strategy, Ketchum

Would you like to commission a talk, workshop or event?
Get in touch with Sarah Hyndman

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Photos by Benjamin Glean (corporate workshops and sponsored sessions); Graham Sturt (corporate workshops); David Owens (sponsored sessions).

This is the first instalment of a review of 2017—a busy and exciting year in which Type Tasting has popped up in prestigious locations both in the UK and abroad (read part 2 here).

Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman is on a mission to make typography relevant and engaging for all, she also believes that design can create positive change. Sarah specialises in making a complex topic accessible with originality, humour, a dash of theatre and lashings of audience participation. This year she has spoken at the launch of a new watch, a fragrance conference, she has been interviewed by The Times and on Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch. She has created an immersive exhibition for the British Academy, and run workshops for adidas, BumbleBizz, Wellcome and WGSN. The Type Tasting pop-up lab also gathered data for the latest collaborative study with the team from the University of Oxford, and her latest book was published.

Public speaking
Sarah’s interactive talks are packed with games and demonstrations that inform, entertain and challenge preconceptions. She has been a guest speaker at events such as the recent Mondaine watch press launch, the Fragrance Forum conference, and has spoken in Canada, Denmark, and India.

• Design Thinkers Toronto
• Fragrance forum, London
• Glug Birmingham
• Mondaine watch press launch pre-dinner talk
• Northern Design Symposium, Newcastle
• We Love Graphic Design, Copenhagen
• W.I. Fulham & Chelsea, London
• University of Wolverhampton

“Sarah is a fantastic speaker – she engages audiences with a brilliant mix of warmth, good humour and real insight into her subject matter – in which she is expert. She quickly warmed up a noisy crowd and had them eating out of her hand, everyone taking part (almost unheard of) and I only heard good things about her talk afterwards Luke Tonge, Glug curator

“Insightful and entertaining…a tricky synergy to pull off – bravo!” Laura Piche, Design Thinkers Toronto

“It was great!! The audience erupted with laughter during your talk” Lisa Hassell, Glug organiser

“Just loved your typography karaoke” Amelia Roblin, Design Thinkers Toronto

Exhibitions
Sarah collaborates with exciting and innovative people such as Tasha Marks of AVM Curiosities, as well as perfumers, composers, chefs and scientists. Together they create interactive exhibitions and experiential events that take participants on a multisensory journey, immersing them in typography and culture.

British Academy ‘Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions’; an interactive exhibition and Lates event held in May. This is an interactive sensory exploration of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice, created by AVM Curiosities & Type Tasting for the British Academy’s Literature Week. Taking inspiration from the typography found in three editions of this classic novel, Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions uses type, sound, sight and scent to serve one story three ways.

“A thoughtful and contemporary way of deconstructing Pride and Prejudice” Marisa Smith, The British Academy

“Beautiful and so original, I could have spent hours looking (and hearing and smelling)” Tora Orde-Powlett, Penguin Books

“Black lobster and Jane Austen—of course! And the aroma of the printing press mingled with violet and patchouli oil scented books, it is a sensory delight” Rosalind Freeborn

Would you like to commission a talk, workshop or event?
Get in touch with Sarah Hyndman

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Photos by Jonathan Cherry (main public speaking photo taken at Glug Birmingham); Pride, Prejudice & Perceptions by the British Academy.

 

dazed-burger

By Sarah Hyndman

I chatted to Louis Bradley of Dazed and Confused Magazine about typographic rebellion and how the ultimate way to rebel against the increasing ubiquity of the sans serif might be to use fonts that provoke a reaction like Comic Sans or Papyrus.

“How to start a revolution with Comic Sans. Could something as simple as font have been the catalyst for the spread of punk or behind Donald Trump’s win? We explore the hidden power of typeface”

The idea that something as simple as typeface can be an integral part of a protest movement might sound a bit far-fetched. But the role of fonts is just as important as actual words in communicating a message to the masses. It’s why you don’t ever stray too far away from Arial or Times New Roman on your CV – you don’t want to come across as too much of an avant-garde loose canon by opting for Lucida Handwriting or Bradley Hand. Or why you don’t commonly use curly script-like letters for your uni essays.

Sarah Hyndman creates workshops and events designed to teach the art of typography and deconstruct the power of design. The ‘Never Mind The Typography’ exhibition outlines how the angst and rebellion of punk was expressed in every fibre of the counterculture, even right down to the lettering. “When punk (and its typeface) arrived in the mid-70s, the design at that point in time was very traditional and old-fashioned, kind of nostalgic and backwards looking,” she explains. It was this reaction to the rigid restrictions of modernism that gave birth to a whole new movement in innovative design. Cast your mind back to the creator of the ransom note style and the Sex Pistols logo Jamie Reid, and the slick layered graphics on British Independent album sleeves created by Barney Bubbles, who also designed the logo for NME magazine. “With all of this comes the layering of meanings, layering of images, often lots of references and subtexts that were put in so you had to be in the know to understand the references. You know from that type style that the album is going to be in a certain rebellious underground – it’s going to have swearing in it, basically.”

Read the full article in Dazed…

Punk was the anti-Helvetica Design Week interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman

Bookshelf for It's Nice That

Designer and type fanatic Sarah Hyndman shares her most-cherished books with It’s Nice That.
By Rebecca Fulleylove

Sarah Hyndman is a graphic designer, author, researcher and the founder of Type Tasting, an experimental type studio delivering talks, workshops and events. Sarah researches and teaches about the psychology of type and how to use it to communicate more effectively. She runs workshops, gives talks and creates events such as Wine and Type Tastings, which pose the question: “Do you judge a wine by its label?” Sarah is also the author of Why Fonts Matter, which we published an extract from earlier this year that discussed the effects of typography on our emotions. She is just on the cusp of publishing a second book, How to Draw Type and Influence People, which will be published by Laurence King in spring 2017.

The designer’s inspiration comes from outside the design world, taking ideas from different genres and exploring them through the lens of typography. With this abundance of influences we wanted to find out what sits atop Sarah’s bookshelf and lucky for us it’s a diverse mix of books on packaging design, typography and food.

Read more…

Design Week, sarah hyndman

Typographer and graphic designer Sarah Hyndman, author of Why Fonts Matter, will be giving a talk this month about the power of typefaces in the punk era, part of the current Graphics of Punk exhibition on at the Museum of Brands.

We speak to her about how punk democratised design, and why Snapchat is the modern-day equivalent.

Design Week: Why did you get involved in the Graphics of Punk exhibition?

Sarah Hyndman: Type charts social and historic change. The Museum of Brands is a place where you can see all these voices speaking through all of its products and packaging, which wouldn’t normally be shown in an exhibition because they’re not considered high design. My area of interest is how type is woven into the social fabric of our lives – it’s something that I’m on a mission to democratise.

DW: What will you be talking about in the Never Mind the Typography talk?

SH: It’s an hour-long, interactive talk. I’m going to start by looking at what Britain was like in the early, post-war 1970s – there were a lot of social conventions, and the graphic design community was still besotted by the formality of modernism and minimalism. The UK was also going through a recession and it was a massive time of change. Then punk appeared and completely broke the rule book. It was shocking compared to everything else that was happening.

I’ll look then at how punk gave people a voice. It wasn’t about the designers, or the establishment. This was before Apple Macs were around, so you couldn’t just print your own posters. You’d have to go to a typesetter, and the method would be expensive. Punks ignored all of that and found this really immediate way of disseminating their voices. Punk graphics and typography have become part of the everyday vernacular today, but it was very empowering at the time.

Read full article in Design Week…

Book a Typographic rebellion ‘Learn, socialise & create’ session
How to start a revolution with Comic Sans Dazed & Confused magazine interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman