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“If you see a “danger” sign written in the Comic Sans typeface, would you pay attention to the warning? What does Times New Roman taste like? Is a lemon fast or slow?” Paul Bignell for i Newspaper.

“These questions probably haven’t crossed your mind – indeed, they may make no sense at all. But in the studio of typographic artist Sarah Hyndman, they are vital. Here, art prints mingle with old bottles plastered with labels that say “Eat Me” in an elaborate font. It’s a cross between a science lab, a trendy artists’ hub and an old curiosity shoppe. There are Helvetica water biscuits in jars (I’m told not to eat them as they are well past their sell-by date), 1950s Coca-Cola bottles in a display case and a rack of test tubes with a strange-looking pink liquid at the bottom.”

“Stealth health – it’s all in the font Hyndman understands that you couldn’t convince chocolate manufacturers to change how they work. However, through the power of fonts, she believes there is scope for approaching the healthier end of the food market by stealth, by giving these companies the same tools as those that sell unhealthy products.”

Read the extended online i Newspaper article here…

“Some believe that smaller chocolate bars and sweets are the answer, others want a tax on sugary drinks or to encourage children to be more active. One expert, however, has come up with a novel solution to child obesity.

Sarah Hyndman, a graphic designer, says that the right typefaces can “nudge” people into healthier food choices, and this should start in schools…”

The article references the food can experiment that ran at the recent book launch at Tate Modern, and at the Type Tasting event at Shoreditch House for the D&AD Fringe Festival, were you there?

Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch features history and fashion in type with Sarah Hyndman

Sarah Hyndman interviewed on Sunday Brunch on April 9th 2017, this is available here on catchup TV in the UK (the interview starts at around 01:10). This is an overview of the conversation that covered 550 years of type in eight and a half minutes, with a few supporting facts added in.

The production team and graphics department at Princess Productions sourced and created most of the examples, we all had a lot of fun because they were excited about the segment. Presenter Simon is also a very big type fan and had his copy of the book stashed in his bag to take home with him.

   

Tim: Welcome back to Sunday Brunch live. We’re here with graphic designer and author Sarah Hyndman. You’re going to teach us a little about the history of typography, what is it first of all?

Typography is written language made from preformed letters that can be repeated over and over. During the centuries many shapes and styles of the letters have been designed, all of which have absorbed their own set of associations or meanings. We might think that we don’t notice these meanings, but we do because reading is a complex task performed by our non-conscious (like driving or walking), and as a result the type communicates directly with our non-conscious brain.

Looking at type in context is like code breaking. The shapes and styles appear in all aspects of our everyday lives and form a mirror for social history and cultural change. Looking at the typefaces gives you many clues about historical context, origins and genres.

Simon: I like the word typeface better than font, what’s the difference?

A typeface is the design, like Helvetica. A font is the physical form of a typeface—this could be the metal type we print with, or the digital file on your computer. However, the terms are used fairly interchangeably outside the professional world of graphic design and typography.

Tim: You’re now going to take us through the history of a few well-known fonts. First we’re going to look at this gothic font, when was this first used?

Printing first came to Europe in the 1400s and at the time, like many new technologies, it copied the format of the existing technology—in this case hand-written books. Books were huge and prestigious artefacts, carefully hand written by monks and scribes in ornate and calligraphy style that we know as gothic or Blackletter.

Simon: You wouldn’t expect to read a book in this style today?

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It's Nice That Review of the Year

Goodbye 2016, hello 2017

It’s been quite a year. Thank you to all of you who have been a part of Type Tasting and joined in so enthusiastically. I’ve enjoyed meeting you, and I’m looking forward to the new events planned for next year. Instead of writing a summary of the year I would like to share the interview I recently gave It’s Nice That for their Review of the Year, because the great questions they ask frame the summary perfectly. Below are extracts or you can read the full interview here.

It’s Nice That Review of the Year 2016 
Graphic designer Sarah Hyndman. 

Words by Rebecca Fulleylove.

Our tenth interview for Review of the Year sees us chat to designer Sarah Hyndman about the incredible experiences she’s had this year and the work she continues to do with Type Tasting.

Designer and type champion Sarah Hyndman is on a mission to “prove that typography is fun and engaging for everyone”, and 2016 has seen her take major steps in making that idea a reality. Her work, which takes the form of books, workshops, talks and events, aims to “dispel the myth that type is a dusty subject for academics and experts” and “demonstrate the power of typography”.

What was your creative highlight of 2016?
“Going to Mumbai, India to teach 60 design students… At the end I could see first-hand how my unconventional approach to teaching typography really works.
”

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dazed-burger

By Sarah Hyndman

I chatted to Louis Bradley of Dazed and Confused Magazine about typographic rebellion and how the ultimate way to rebel against the increasing ubiquity of the sans serif might be to use fonts that provoke a reaction like Comic Sans or Papyrus.

“How to start a revolution with Comic Sans. Could something as simple as font have been the catalyst for the spread of punk or behind Donald Trump’s win? We explore the hidden power of typeface”

The idea that something as simple as typeface can be an integral part of a protest movement might sound a bit far-fetched. But the role of fonts is just as important as actual words in communicating a message to the masses. It’s why you don’t ever stray too far away from Arial or Times New Roman on your CV – you don’t want to come across as too much of an avant-garde loose canon by opting for Lucida Handwriting or Bradley Hand. Or why you don’t commonly use curly script-like letters for your uni essays.

Sarah Hyndman creates workshops and events designed to teach the art of typography and deconstruct the power of design. The ‘Never Mind The Typography’ exhibition outlines how the angst and rebellion of punk was expressed in every fibre of the counterculture, even right down to the lettering. “When punk (and its typeface) arrived in the mid-70s, the design at that point in time was very traditional and old-fashioned, kind of nostalgic and backwards looking,” she explains. It was this reaction to the rigid restrictions of modernism that gave birth to a whole new movement in innovative design. Cast your mind back to the creator of the ransom note style and the Sex Pistols logo Jamie Reid, and the slick layered graphics on British Independent album sleeves created by Barney Bubbles, who also designed the logo for NME magazine. “With all of this comes the layering of meanings, layering of images, often lots of references and subtexts that were put in so you had to be in the know to understand the references. You know from that type style that the album is going to be in a certain rebellious underground – it’s going to have swearing in it, basically.”

Read the full article in Dazed…

Punk was the anti-Helvetica Design Week interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman

Bookshelf for It's Nice That

Designer and type fanatic Sarah Hyndman shares her most-cherished books with It’s Nice That.
By Rebecca Fulleylove

Sarah Hyndman is a graphic designer, author, researcher and the founder of Type Tasting, an experimental type studio delivering talks, workshops and events. Sarah researches and teaches about the psychology of type and how to use it to communicate more effectively. She runs workshops, gives talks and creates events such as Wine and Type Tastings, which pose the question: “Do you judge a wine by its label?” Sarah is also the author of Why Fonts Matter, which we published an extract from earlier this year that discussed the effects of typography on our emotions. She is just on the cusp of publishing a second book, How to Draw Type and Influence People, which will be published by Laurence King in spring 2017.

The designer’s inspiration comes from outside the design world, taking ideas from different genres and exploring them through the lens of typography. With this abundance of influences we wanted to find out what sits atop Sarah’s bookshelf and lucky for us it’s a diverse mix of books on packaging design, typography and food.

Read more…

Design Week, sarah hyndman

Typographer and graphic designer Sarah Hyndman, author of Why Fonts Matter, will be giving a talk this month about the power of typefaces in the punk era, part of the current Graphics of Punk exhibition on at the Museum of Brands.

We speak to her about how punk democratised design, and why Snapchat is the modern-day equivalent.

Design Week: Why did you get involved in the Graphics of Punk exhibition?

Sarah Hyndman: Type charts social and historic change. The Museum of Brands is a place where you can see all these voices speaking through all of its products and packaging, which wouldn’t normally be shown in an exhibition because they’re not considered high design. My area of interest is how type is woven into the social fabric of our lives – it’s something that I’m on a mission to democratise.

DW: What will you be talking about in the Never Mind the Typography talk?

SH: It’s an hour-long, interactive talk. I’m going to start by looking at what Britain was like in the early, post-war 1970s – there were a lot of social conventions, and the graphic design community was still besotted by the formality of modernism and minimalism. The UK was also going through a recession and it was a massive time of change. Then punk appeared and completely broke the rule book. It was shocking compared to everything else that was happening.

I’ll look then at how punk gave people a voice. It wasn’t about the designers, or the establishment. This was before Apple Macs were around, so you couldn’t just print your own posters. You’d have to go to a typesetter, and the method would be expensive. Punks ignored all of that and found this really immediate way of disseminating their voices. Punk graphics and typography have become part of the everyday vernacular today, but it was very empowering at the time.

Read full article in Design Week…

Book a Typographic rebellion ‘Learn, socialise & create’ session
How to start a revolution with Comic Sans Dazed & Confused magazine interview
2016 is the new 1976 Sarah Hyndman
How Punk changed Graphic Design Sarah Hyndman