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typography is the new rock n roll

Type Tasting has been touring the streets of Dalston exploring the signs that illuminate our social rituals, rummaging around in record shops* looking at type on album covers, and next year we’re off to take part in SXSW in Austin, Texas. Typography is the new Rock ‘n’ Roll. We’ll tell you more soon…

*Read the article in the next issue of Artrocker Magazine

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Top 5 spots for a typographic day out in London
By Sarah Hyndman

1. London Transport Museum
This museum in Covent Garden is crammed with the informative typography that we have used every day for almost a century to navigate our way around the city. The buses and signage date from the 1920s to the present day and sit side by side, enabling us to compare the lettering and how it has changed over the years.

Photo ©TfL, from the London Transport Museum collection. http://www.ltmuseum.co.uk

©Kath Tudball

2. Highgate Cemetery
The inscriptions on the gravestones in this beautiful North London cemetery give a view of London’s social history dating back to 1839, with many prominent figures buried there. The lettering to be seen ranges from ornate Victorian script to the typographic simplicity of Patrick Caulfield’s headstone (above). Tours are open to the public all year round.

Photo by Kath Tudball

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fot leaflet_CR

Blog: Future of Type ‘Results are in…’
Results are in on the future of type

By Rachael Steven, Creative Review 13 May 2013

Earlier this month, designer Sarah Hyndman hosted a St Brides workshop asking: “What is the Future of Type?” The question provoked mixed reactions on Twitter ahead of the event: on the day, Hyndman says, some common themes emerged.

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eat your words cover

Eat your Words: Food as a System of Communication and its role in a Post-culinary Society.

Sarah Hyndman, MA Typo/graphic Studies Thesis, February 2001 (Distinction). London College of Communication, University of the Arts London.

Author’s note on the ‘post-culinary society’ of 2000/2001: At the time of writing there were concerns about the rise in popularity of convenience food and a generation who had not been taught how to cook. However, Jamie Oliver had just published The Naked Chef and Britain was soon to fall in love with cooking again.

Eat Your Words illustration of iced biscuits

“The ideal celebratory meal had a structure that started off with an appetising hot and messy dish of gravy over meat and potatoes (without which a meal is not a dinner), and became more of an architectural achievement as it went on through pudding (on a smaller plate), and tea with an optional small coloured biscuit (on a still smaller plate).” Michael Nicod

final piece

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