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How to Draw Type and Influence People

You are invited to our Type Tasting Christmas Open Studios Weekend on 25th & 26th November from 11am-5pm. The Chocolate Factory N16, Farleigh Place (off Farleigh Road), London N16 7SX.

There will be something experimental taking place in the Pop-up Lab. The studio will be full of all things typography—to look at and to buy. Including signed copies of Sarah’s books, limited edition screen prints, and letters to hang on your Christmas tree.

Chat to Sarah about an event or workshop for your organisation, either as a Christmas jolly or some teambuilding inspiration to see in the New Year. This year she has created Type Tastings for adidas, British Academy, Bumble Bizz, D&AD, The Fragrance Forum, Monotype at Design Thinkers Toronto, the V&A for the London Design Festival, Wellcome Collection, and WGSN.

Private view evening
Type Tasting supporters are invited to the private view on Friday 24th November from 6.30pm-9.30pm, please RSVP sarah(a)typetasting.com

I would like to invite you to join me on Sunday 2nd July for a drink and to look through development sketches and final drawings created for my recent book ‘How to Draw Type and Influence People’. This is also an opportunity to talk to me about the workshops and events that I host, along with my research adventures (including the collaborative ‘Jelly bean’ study that has just been submitted with Professor Charles Spence, University of Oxford).

There will be a studio sale of screen prints, postcards and pictures from earlier stages of my career, these will be offered at specially discounted prices and are not available anywhere else.

The open day will take place on Sunday 2nd July from midday until 6pm in Studio F7, The Chocolate Factory N16, Farleigh Place, Stoke Newington, London, N16 7SX. I would be grateful if you would RSVP to sarah(a)typetasting.com. Other studios will be open for you to browse around and talk to the artists.

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Please join me for an evening as I present How to Draw Type and Influence People in my local bookshop over a glass of wine. This is a fantastic and welcoming independent bookshop in North London. Pull up a chair as I talk about the science of why drawing on paper is ‘magic’; show you that type isn’t just for experts and geeks; tell you what inspired me to fall in love with type; and share stories that will make you look at your font menu in a new light. Afterwards I’ll be signing books and answering your questions.

Author talk and book signing with Sarah Hyndman
How to Draw Type and Influence People
Thursday 11th May 8pm (talk starts at 8.15)
Stoke Newington Bookshop
159 Stoke Newington High Street
London N16 0NY
£5, turn up on the night or book in advance here.

We had an amazing launch evening at Tate Modern a week ago, thank you all so much for coming along and to Laurence King Publishing. We filled the bookshop with experiments, games and giant sweets for everybody to explore as I mingled, signed books and talked about my typographic explorations. The Times printed a short piece with a first glimpse of experiment results from the evening, read this here. A list of all the recent press coverage is here.

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“If you see a “danger” sign written in the Comic Sans typeface, would you pay attention to the warning? What does Times New Roman taste like? Is a lemon fast or slow?” Paul Bignell for i Newspaper.

“These questions probably haven’t crossed your mind – indeed, they may make no sense at all. But in the studio of typographic artist Sarah Hyndman, they are vital. Here, art prints mingle with old bottles plastered with labels that say “Eat Me” in an elaborate font. It’s a cross between a science lab, a trendy artists’ hub and an old curiosity shoppe. There are Helvetica water biscuits in jars (I’m told not to eat them as they are well past their sell-by date), 1950s Coca-Cola bottles in a display case and a rack of test tubes with a strange-looking pink liquid at the bottom.”

“Stealth health – it’s all in the font Hyndman understands that you couldn’t convince chocolate manufacturers to change how they work. However, through the power of fonts, she believes there is scope for approaching the healthier end of the food market by stealth, by giving these companies the same tools as those that sell unhealthy products.”

Read the extended online i Newspaper article here…

“Some believe that smaller chocolate bars and sweets are the answer, others want a tax on sugary drinks or to encourage children to be more active. One expert, however, has come up with a novel solution to child obesity.

Sarah Hyndman, a graphic designer, says that the right typefaces can “nudge” people into healthier food choices, and this should start in schools…”

The article references the food can experiment that ran at the recent book launch at Tate Modern, and at the Type Tasting event at Shoreditch House for the D&AD Fringe Festival, were you there?

Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch features history and fashion in type with Sarah Hyndman

Sarah Hyndman interviewed on Sunday Brunch on April 9th 2017, this is available here on catchup TV in the UK (the interview starts at around 01:10). This is an overview of the conversation that covered 550 years of type in eight and a half minutes, with a few supporting facts added in.

The production team and graphics department at Princess Productions sourced and created most of the examples, we all had a lot of fun because they were excited about the segment. Presenter Simon is also a very big type fan and had his copy of the book stashed in his bag to take home with him.

   

Tim: Welcome back to Sunday Brunch live. We’re here with graphic designer and author Sarah Hyndman. You’re going to teach us a little about the history of typography, what is it first of all?

Typography is written language made from preformed letters that can be repeated over and over. During the centuries many shapes and styles of the letters have been designed, all of which have absorbed their own set of associations or meanings. We might think that we don’t notice these meanings, but we do because reading is a complex task performed by our non-conscious (like driving or walking), and as a result the type communicates directly with our non-conscious brain.

Looking at type in context is like code breaking. The shapes and styles appear in all aspects of our everyday lives and form a mirror for social history and cultural change. Looking at the typefaces gives you many clues about historical context, origins and genres.

Simon: I like the word typeface better than font, what’s the difference?

A typeface is the design, like Helvetica. A font is the physical form of a typeface—this could be the metal type we print with, or the digital file on your computer. However, the terms are used fairly interchangeably outside the professional world of graphic design and typography.

Tim: You’re now going to take us through the history of a few well-known fonts. First we’re going to look at this gothic font, when was this first used?

Printing first came to Europe in the 1400s and at the time, like many new technologies, it copied the format of the existing technology—in this case hand-written books. Books were huge and prestigious artefacts, carefully hand written by monks and scribes in ornate and calligraphy style that we know as gothic or Blackletter.

Simon: You wouldn’t expect to read a book in this style today?

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